Car Care Tips

  • Wash your car when it is cool and out of direct sunlight.
  • Clean the tires and wheels first so you won't splash water all over your newly cleaned vehicle.
  • Begin by washing the dirt and soil off the surfaces so it won't be rubbed in and cause scratches.
  • Use a 100% cotton wash mitt or a high quality sea sponge.
  • Wash the car from the top down, in straight lines and using overlapping strokes.
  • Never use household liquid soaps, which can strip the protective wax coat.
  • Remember to clean inside the wheel wells.
  • When drying your car, open up all doors and lids to enable semi-exposed areas to dry completely.
  • Use real waxes, which can't harm the finish. Avoid products that promise to remove dirt, oxidized paint or scratches. Brazilian Carnauba wax is the wax of choice for automotive paints.
  • Never wax in direct sunlight, since hot metal surfaces can cause the wax chemicals to damage the finish.
  • If wax is applied in high humidity it may streak.
  • Small areas should be waxed at one time. Constantly rotate the cleaning towel to apply a fresh area for proper wax removal.
  • Use a foam applicator rather than a cloth.
  • Avoid brush-style car washes, which can cause dirt to scratch the paint.
  • Also try to avoid facilities that use odorless ammonia or phosphate based soaps with recycled wash water.
  • At a "do it yourself" car wash, use the lowest possible setting in order to avoid blasting grit into the car's finish.
  • As much as possible, avoid long-term exposure to the sun. Ultraviolet light causes discoloration, cracking and a loss of gloss.
  • Protect your vehicle's paint by avoiding gravel roads whenever possible.
  • Regularly use commercially available bug removers. Bugs have very acidic bodies that will damage your vehicle's paint.
  • Avoid parking under trees, which may drop sap.
  • Remove bird droppings immediately, as they contain phosphates that will rapidly turn into phosphoric acid.
  • Acid rain damage may look like ordinary water spots, but it is much more damaging because it can actually etch the surface, creating craters with cracks and chips.
  • Heat accelerates acid-rain damage. Try to wash your car after every rain, especially if the sun comes out right after it stops. To neutralize any acid rain residue, try adding a tablespoon of baking soda for every gallon of water in the wash bucket.
  • Acid rain can seriously damage a vehicle's paint. If you do suffer acid rain damage, repairing it is best left to the professionals at Associated Collision Center.
  • If all your washing, waxing and TLC can't bring back the shine--call us and will protect your investment in your vehicle.
  • Paint oxidation and the sun's ultraviolet rays age the appearance of a vehicle. So, rather than just spot painting body repairs, you'll probably want to have your entire vehicle painted.
  • Have your car repainted at the first sign of a permanent reduction in gloss. Over time, the microscopic cracking already present will become more obvious, and the affected surface may have to be stripped before repainting.
  • Quick attention to nicks, dents and scratches protects sheet metal and inhibits the corrosion process.
  • Have your car checked out after even a minor accident. The whole body can become distorted in a collision, and even minor body misalignment can affect performance and safety.
  • New paint increases resale market value and if you are looking to sell, it sells faster.